Active Events Stories
Active Events

Edisa’s story

Edisa is from Uganda. She is 23 and not only has she never had a wheelchair; just 2 weeks before we met her she had never in her life sat up. Edisa arrived at the distribution lying completely flat and bent over, covering two seats on the back seat of a taxi hired to bring her. She was completely stuck in this folded position and, even with the quality of the chairs, equipment and the expert team, we were worried we would be unable to get her in a chair.

After numerous adjustments to the chair and a long assessment and fitting, we managed to get Edisa sitting upright and comfortable. It was heart-warming to see her face as she looked up and around her for the first time, after having spent her entire life on the floor at shoe level. She could not stop her beaming smiles, was uncontrollably excited and kept repeating ‘thank you, thank you very much’.

Shifan’s Story

Seven-year-old Shifan was left paralysed when she was struck by cerebral malaria as a small child. Her mother carried her everywhere until she became too heavy and had no choice but to leave Shifan at home while she went to work. In 2015, Walkabout gave Shifan her very first ToughRider wheelchair. Having a wheelchair means Shifan can now go to school, play, learn, and make friends. The happiest of students, Shifan is the pride and joy of her class. This wheelchair has given her freedom, independence and access to education.

Charity’s story

Charity Nana (yes, her first name is Charity!) experienced a lifetime of isolation and continually struggled to gain acceptance in her community. Since receiving one of our ToughRider wheelchairs in 2014, she has devoted her life to supporting the disabled. She visits parents and guardians of children with disabilities, bringing practical help, encouragement and fresh hope to those who are so often ignored.

Leon’s story

When the earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, Leon Gaisli lost everything. His home was flattened, his wife and all eight of his children were killed and when he was pulled from the rubble, he was paralysed from the waist down. For Leon, his RoughRider wheelchair represented a means to regain his physical strength and sense of purpose in life. Two years later, not even Leon could have imagined where that chair would take him. In 2012, he became just one of three Haitians ever to represent his nation at the London Paralympics.